Saturday, March 26, 2011

evince

evince [ɪˈvɪns] v.t.

1.) To show in a clear manner; to prove beyond any reasonable doubt; to manifest; to make evident; to bring to light; to evidence.
2.) [Obs.] To conquer; to subdue (GNU International Collaborative Dictionary of English).

Etymology: Latin evincere vanquish completely, prevail, succeed in proving; e out + vincere to vanquish.

"The quiet seclusion of Dingley Dell, the presence of so many of the gentler sex, and the solicitude and anxiety they evinced in his behalf, were all favourable to the growth and development of those softer feelings which nature had implanted deep in the bosom of Mr. Tracy Tupman, and which now appeared destined to centre in one lovely object" (The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, Charles Dickens, 1837).

10 comments:

Every Day said...

uh oh. my english sucks.

Oscar said...

This is my favourite blog, I love you.

Danny Murphy said...

I have a buddy who likes to bring out words that most people have not heard just so he gets to explain the meaning, looking forward to seeing his face when i break this out.

Shoeby said...

Sounds like Convince, so i guess it would come from the same Latin root.

Glovey said...

Lol Great idea! love the blog!

The Speaker said...

Enjoyed this hoping to come back soon for another word. Interesting set up. Very much enjoyed.

Photo Blog said...

awesome as always =)
thanks for sharing your wisdom

TheMonopolyGuy said...

It's like HotForWords but without the video

Janez said...

you have evinced me :P

Elliot MacLeod-Michael said...

knew this one, but not its etymology. appreciate what you're doing here, following.

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